News of Yore 1908: News Round-Up

(All items from The Fourth Estate)

July 11
Augustus O’Shaughnessy, who until recently was an illustrator on the staff of the Chicago Daily News, has opened a studio in the Fine Art Building, Chicago.

Wallace Goldsmith, a cartoonist on the Boston Herald, made his debut in vaudeville at Keith’s Theatre,  Boston, recently in a lightning sketch act.

A.W. Scarborough, better known as “Scar,” has resigned from the cartoonists’ staff of the New York Globe and joined that of the World.

August 1
John Farnum, cartoonist for the Springfield (Mass.) Union, was married July 18 at Albany, N.Y., to Miss Martha Ferguson. Mr. Farnum formerly was on the staff of the Boston Post, Boston Traveller, Providence Telegram, Albany Times and other papers.

September 12
Walter Saalberg, a cartoonist at different times connected with the New York Journal, Chicago Chronicle and San Francisco Examiner, died recently in Harrisburg, Pa., at the age of thirty-two years. [this cartoonist was in all the same cities as Charles Saalburg but mostly at the wrong papers — really botched obit or extreme coincidence?]

September 26
F.M. Howarth, one of the best known comic artists in the country died in Philadelphia Tuesday, aged forty-three years. He began work on Puck and later was employed on the Hearst papers, is credited with having originated the comic series using the same characters day after day in the newspapers. Two of his best known series were “E.Z. Mark” and “Lulu and Leander.”

October 3
George McManus, creator of the “Newlyweds” series of cartoons appearing in the New York World, has gone into vaudeville. He appeared successfully at the Alhambra, New York, last week, his specialty being making sketches of his cartoon characters on a blackboard.

October 17
The Danbury, Conn., Agricultural Society has awarded a diploma to the New York World for its exhibition, at the recent fair held by the association, of original drawings and plates of the “Newlyweds” series of comic pictures appearing in that paper.

November 14
Peter B. McCord, cartoonist and author, died Tuesday in his home, at 190 South 9th Street, Newark. He was forty years old. For eight years he had been on the Newark Evening News’ staff. A book entitled “The Wolf,” illustrated and written by himself and dealing with the life of the ancient cave dwellers, is about to be published.

December 5
Charles Tebbs, manager of the art department of the New York World, has been succeeded by T.O. McGill, an artist of that department and originator of the “Jollys’ Bull Pup” series of cartoons. Mr. Tebbs’ future plans have not been announced.

December 26
George McManus, the New York World artist and creator of the celebrated Newlyweds, Panhandle Pete and other comic pictures, was married to Miss Florence Bergere, the original Mrs. Newlywed, on Wednesday.

4 thoughts on “News of Yore 1908: News Round-Up

  1. “Walter Saalberg, a cartoonist at different times connected with the New York Journal, Chicago Chronicle and San Francisco Examiner, died recently in Harrisburg, Pa., at the age of thirty-two years. [this cartoonist was in all the same cities as Charles Saalburg but mostly at the wrong papers — really botched obit or extreme coincidence?]”

    Neither, Walter L. Saalberg (1877-1908) was the brother of Charles W. Saalburg (1865-1947). They were 2 of the sons of William Saalburg (1834-1914), publisher and editor of the Hebrew Observer in SF. (another brother was a journalist).

  2. Hi Steven —
    Thanks for solving that mystery — weird that the brothers spelled their names differently! Seems you might know a bit about Charles Saalburg, I’ve been looking for biographical info for many years. Any suggestions?

    –Allan

  3. Wish I knew more about Walter for you, you would think the history of American Printing would have lots about him. I do see that his dad also edited the (SF) Wasp at some point.
    Lastly, names were at loser a hundred years ago than they are now.
    many stated didn’t have registered births until the 1910s, and my family actually settled on a preferred last name spelling in the circa 1890s. I’ve seen Walter’s dad spelled both ways.

  4. Walter L. Saalburg was born in San Francisco, California in April 1877. According to the 1880 U.S. Federal Census Walter was the seventh child of William and Jennie; the family resided at 1308[?] Geary Street.

    Walter lived in Chicago, Illinois at 5646 South Boulevard, as recorded in the 1900 census. He was a boarder with the Frink family which was headed by George M., who was employed at the Monotype Foundry (The cartoonist George Frink’s middle initial was O.) Walter’s occupation was an artist.

    In 1901 Walter lived in Cleveland, Ohio where he married Lucile Goodhart on May 24; in the “US, Ohio, Cuyahoga County, Jewish Marriage Record Extracts” his last name was spelled “Saalberg”. The couple divorced on July 1, 1905 as recorded in the Cuyahoga County Archives.

    Walter’s passing was reported in the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) on August 25, 1908.

    Walter Saalberg, aged thirty-two years, a cartoonist formerly employed
    on the San Francisco Examiner, New York Journal and Chicago
    Chronicle, but within the past month engaged here on a newspaper,
    died yesterday morning at the Harrisburg Hospital.

    Mr. Saalberg has two brothers in San Francisco who were notified of
    the death.

    According to the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry, Walter was buried at the Hills of Eternity Memorial Park Congregation Sherith Israel in Colma, California on April 16, 1909.

    Walter and his brother Charles are included in the book, Artists in California, 1786-1940: L-Z (Crocker Art Museum, 2002).

    by Alex Jay

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